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How to properly mount a rifle scope.

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9 replies to this topic

#1
RSE Custom Guns

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Proper Scope Mounting

We will start from scratch here. A brand new remington 700 bolt action rifle, millett 2 piece windage adjustable scope bases, millett scope rings and a leupold 3-9 variable power scope. Fairly common hunting rig.

Now lets mount the scope the right way to achieve its full accuracy potential.

Note: If you follow this scope mounting procedure exactly it will be impossible to cant the scope.

1. Mount the rifle in a padded vise as far away from a wall opposing the muzzle end of the rifle, the farther away the better.

2. Attach the scope mount base to the rifle securely.

3. Now take a level and lay it on the base horizontal to the rifle bore. Level the rig out in the vise and lock it down.

4. Attach the scope rings, make sure the scope will lay down into the rings without them moving when you go to tighten the scope into the rings.

5. Now take the scope and put it between 2 v blocks and spin the scope watching the crosshairs for wobble, adjust the scope to insure there is no wobble in the crosshairs, this is critical to your accuracy.

6. Check to make sure that your rig is still level in the vise and then set the scope in the rings.

7. On the opposing wall away from the rifle muzzle draw a vertical and horizontal line, again using a level to insure that the line is plumb vertically and level horizontally. It should look like a plus sign.

8. Remove the bolt from the rifle, looking through the rifles bore, center the plus sign in it.
Note: If you can't remove the bolt use a laser chamber boresighter only.

9. Do Not Use The Windage Screws On The Scope For This Procedure.

Align the vertical post in the scope with the vertical line on the wall using only the windage screws on the scope base and tighten down the scope rings, make sure that all stay level and plumb vertically and horizontally.

10. If you have done everything correctly, you have just mounted the scope to all the exact tolerances that have been machined into all the scope mount components. Everything to its true and exact mechanical center point.

11. Your rifles scope is now properly mounted and is range ready for a true sight-in, if you have followed this method of scope mounting use my method to properly sight in your rifle. Go to the rifle shooting section.

#2
Guest_SteveB_*

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Thanks for the good info Scott. I have a question about step 5. How does one "adjust the scope to insure there is no wobble in the crosshairs"? I hope I'm not the only new guy that doesn't know.
Thanks

#3
RSE Custom Guns

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SteveB,

There are many different ways to mount a scope, and everyone has his or her own opinion of what works best for them, but in the post above I tried to relate to a way that the average person might be capable of getting his or her scope properly mounted taking into consideration what tools, equipment, and items that the average person might have available to them. In the post, I have laid out ways to get the rifle level, have a level alignment indication on an ajoining wall, and how one might reference having the scope crosshairs centered prior to mounting the scope onto the rifle. This is what #5 is about, centering the crosshairs in the scope first. Years ago before "always centered" crosshairs the vertical and horizonal crosshair in a rifle scope used to move independently, and so if this were the case then you could actually see more of a "wobble" or centered effect, however; even with today's high tech "always centered" crosshairs these "centered crosshairs" only appear to be centered when you look through your rifle scope......."always centered" crosshairs that are not "centered" can be viewed by using the method listed in item #5 above......and if not centered you will be able to see a "wobble"......one must be certain to have a level set of V-blocks that are in proper alignment.........try it, you will see...........(but careful not to scratch your scope while turning it in the V-blocks). Some people like to turn the scope windage and elevation knobs all the way up and down counting the clicks, and all the way left and right and then split the difference assuming that they have "centered" their scope's crosshairs.....this oftem times does bring the scope close to center, but not always. Some scopes will have more travel in elevation than it does with windage, and some scopes will have more windage adjustment than elevation......an example would be a scope that has 90 total clicks of elevation, but only 60 clicks of windage, but to be more realistic, many scope have like 70 total clicks of elevation, and 65 total clicks of windage.

#4
Guest_owain852_*

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wot mounts do u recomend?

#5
smallblockfuelie

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wot mounts do u recomend?



Scott likes Leupold mounts.

#6
tawnoper

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Another step that I always do is lap the rings in. I've had certain rings that hardly had any actual surface touching the scope without lapping. It puts some serious uneven torque on the scope once you tighten them up in that condition.

#7
Guest_Joshua T_*

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Thanks for the info.

#8
Guest_shoot-it_*

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Is lapping the rings necessary for a big game rifle and how is that done?

#9
Rich Cronk

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I have a problem with step #9. If only the rear mount is windage adjustable, like Redfield style rings, I think a man would torque the dickens out of his scope by using those screws to adjust for windage. Am I wrong?

#10
smallblockfuelie

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Rich, I believe he mentioned at the beginning that this guide was for use with Millett rings and bases.





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