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Best Time To Hunt Coyotes

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17 replies to this topic

#1
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This is not just my opinion. Basically anytime from August through December is the best time to hunt coyotes with the optimum months being August and September because of all the young, inexperienced coyotes running around. Only problem is, August is extremely hot as is September in the Southwest. This means the coyotes are more active at night. If you are thinking of seriously hunting coyotes they should be hunted at night during this time.
I know some people are hunting in July, thinking they are going to get all the dumb pups. For whatever reason, the pups are not very active during this time and some of the pups are just puppy sized and haven't grown to their potential yet.
Nevada and California can be great places to hunt at night but you have to be prepared for the heat. Short pants and toe jammers used to be the dress code years ago, only problem was watching your step dodging rattle snakes while picking up coyotes and sage brush cutting up your legs. Other than that we stayed cool. We may have been a little crazy back then or maybe just plain stupid but somehow we survived to tell about it.

For whatever reason, you'll have to figure it out because I can't, the coyote hunting up north, like Nevada, seems to slack off around the end of October and it starts picking up the further south you go. This was noticed over a long period of time years ago and still holds true. Back when we competed in December, teams would go to Arizona and Mexico and bring back 40 to 45 coyotes, numbers unheard of by today's standards. That should confirm my previous statements. Never did we have good hunts in January as numbers dropped off significantly. Probably because coyotes were pairing up getting ready to mate. I realize a coyote still has to eat but for whatever reason they don't respond very well to calling and progressively gets worse.

All this is meant to stimulate some of your minds out there. Remember one thing, when you are predator hunting, not everything is 100% assured. Jim Dougherty said, "always expect the unexpected".
Good Hunting

Edited by onecoyote, 09 July 2009 - 09:08 AM.


#2
Old Timer

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You were braver then I ,I allways wore jeans and even then got stuck with catus but I agree with the times Danny you forgot to tell them days =120 deg and night it drops to the 90S and you would freeze your but at night only seen a few ratlers never got bitten in all the time we spent out there.Got clawed by a bobcat at night but that goes with the hunting Keep up the threds Danny we love them

#3
Inoculation

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I agree Danny. I have taken 5 since July 1st and only have seen a few pups. They are getting to be full size in the areas I have seen them. I don't know all that much about predator calling in general, I just know how to kill them pretty effectively. There are so many ideas and opinions on the net, you just have to try all kinds of things and do what works for you.

For me however, the best time to hunt them is in broad daylight with a shotgun. That is what I know and what I feel most comfortable with so I stick with it. It seems as if the time of year is a minor concern to them. I just adjust my tactics depending on the time of the year.

#4
Old Timer

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When it is all said and done the very best time to hunt coyotes is when they are HUNGRY!!!!!

#5
JimT

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Seems like the best time to go is whenever you can and hope for the best. You know, the worst day calling is better than the best day at work.

#6
acousticmood

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Seems like the best time to go is whenever you can and hope for the best. You know, the worst day calling is better than the best day at work.



Plus 1!!

#7
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The best time to go is not always when you can, just hoping for the best don't always do it either. You got to try and make the best happen, like hunting in areas you know hold animals and checking the weather and the moon if your hunting at night. Odds go up if things are right.
When I posted best time to hunt coyotes was about the best time of the year. Not only has it been my experience but the experience of a few other callers that hunt Nevada in Aug and Sept. Last year was a bad year for young ones but the years before have been OK for those that hunt that area and know where to go.
If some of you would like to try some good action in Nevada, let me know. I can tell you places that have produced lots of coyotes in the past.
I was told on a different forum that a new guy would do just as good in a hot coyote area as a more experienced hunter. Not only do I not believe that, I wonder how many new guys have been taken out to the kind of areas I'm talking about by the people that said that? Experience in the field is not written in a book that you can read and know it all. You got to do it.

OK, I posted again, your turn.

#8
Old Timer

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100% Danny, you can not beat experience

#9
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"I was told on a different forum that a new guy would do just as good in a hot coyote area as a more experienced hunter. Not only do I not believe that......."


This is most certainly true.

I have been the new guy told of hot coyote areas, went alone, and managed to screw up with no one to blame but myself. Lessons were learned, and those mistakes won't be repeated. I hunt when I can enjoy every minute of it, still gotta learn to stay up late and swing some lights though.

Thanks to all of you that have shared so much, not only with me, but with everyone on this forum.

Bottom line is.....The best time to hunt coyotes is when you can hunt with Danny, Bernie, Gerry, Rich, or...........................

#10
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Hi Steve,
I used to take new guys out all the time night hunting when I was a member of the Long Beach and So Cal chapters. I don't remember how many new guys I have taken out but it was a lot. Most of them had no experience night hunting and as you know night hunting is a totally different game. Many times I would call coyotes up close and broad side and a new guy would miss the easy shot because he was looking over the scope to see if he hit the animal. No matter what people tell you, you can usually tell what the animal responding to the call is by the way it acts and the color of their eyes. Knowing how to use the light is very important.

When it comes to night hunting there is nothing like experience. That can only be had by going and doing, not reading about it in some magazine written by some back east expert. To me, people who only hunt the day are one dimensional predator hunters. A hunter that hunts both night and day is an overall better hunter because he's two dimensional. Hunting during the day is a piece of cake when compared to hunting at night. I know that statement will ruffle some feathers but that's ok because I want it to ruffle some feathers to start a good discussion.

By nature predators are more active at night, night hunters should get more action and experience then the day hunter on the average. The hardest part of night hunting is staying up all night when it's slow.

Steve, if I was in half way good shape, I'd take ya out this fall. Unfortunately, that's not gonna happen. Don't ever give up this sport and good luck to you, even if you don't agree with my opinions...lol.
Danny

Edited by onecoyote, 20 July 2009 - 08:08 AM.


#11
tawnoper

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The hardest part of night hunting is staying up all night when it's slow.


Amen to that Danny.

But usually seeing eyes after a couple hours of nothing will wake you up for a little while. At least long enough to start seeing things that ain't there lol.

Edited by tawnoper, 20 July 2009 - 09:11 AM.


#12
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Night hunting the right way is not for wimps that for sure. I know you know about it, you had a good teacher. You got to be a little crazy to do what we've done and a little lucky to have made it through all the things that could have happened. My old partners and I still talk about it, what memories.........Hope you have some good hunting this year.

#13
Rich Cronk

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Onecoyote,

You are giving away a fortune of coyote calling knowledge here. Maybe you should have written a book like Russel Tinsley's "Critters come when called" or something. You obviously know what you are talking about here. I have only one question right now. Did you use a gun to whack those coyotes that you called, or did you simply ugly em to death like Uncle Jay does? :biggrin:

#14
Old Timer

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I agree with you Danny 100% and as a rule most critters sleep durning the day in the heat and hunt at night when it cools down It take a good deal out of you night hunting after two days and two nights you start seeing all kinds of things. I sure if Danny and I got togather we could write several BIG books

Edited by Old Timer, 20 July 2009 - 12:13 PM.


#15
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Rich, I was never smart enough to write a book. Yeah I'm like Jay, I ugly em to death lol. I have to stay home 24-7, so I come to these sights and have a little fun, about all I can do..
For the past few years I've really tried to put something back into the sport we all love so much. Hard to do when you can't go anywhere but I try. If I can help someone I sure well try, so well you and Old Timer because thats the way you guys are, true predator callers.

#16
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Amen to that Danny.

But usually seeing eyes after a couple hours of nothing will wake you up for a little while. At least long enough to start seeing things that ain't there lol.


I seldom had trouble keeping awake during the night no matter how poor the hunting was but once the sun came up and the heat hit me I melted like a crayon. Back then we didn't have air conditioning, either, except 2-70 air conditioning. Roll down two windows and do 70. I remember carrying a gallon jug of water and pouring it over my head to keep me cooled off and awake. When the trip was 300 or 400 miles it was miserable. Most times it was just too hot to pull over and sleep and if one guy slept the other may fall asleep at the wheel killing both of you. Coming back into LA after the weekend was a treat, too. The traffic was stop and go all the way to San Bernardino. I'm surprised none of us got killed out there.

But we did it over and over again. lol

I can't count the times I started seeing things that weren't there, too. My favorite one was seeing a bright light hit us from the rear when there was none. As soon as I turned around to look there was nothing there. Another was seeing like a heavy fog descending on us but when I looked up I could see stars. That's when it's time to sleep.

#17
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That was probably me making that statement "betting on a new guy in a Great area over an old guy in a bad area". However, I was mostly refering to "calling" them in, & not necessarily "hitting" them. And I will ALWAYS stand firm on that - From my yrs of personal experience! We all have our own opinions & "experiences" (or lack of) & is a good thing / what makes the world go around & have debates like this.

Hitting 'em can be tough for a begginer. Worst case I had was one missing 8 in a row; 7 coyotes & 1 bobcat. Couldn't control himself. Next worse was 4 coyotes in a row. These 2 guys alone nearly made me take up golf. BTW, one was a teenager the other in his 60's with MUCH "deer" hunting experience; and is only so-so at that too. So much for experience... another topic heavily debated lately!

I'm also talking day hunting & not at night. I do agree the better hunter being able to hunt both night and day. Which leaves me out, as I only hunt the day shift & have no interest in night hunting. But that is just me! I also have other reservations about night hunting, mostly with safety issues, with just one being the very real hazards of driving without much,if any sleep. There are others!

Anyway, to answer the question, like some others, the best time is whenever one can go.

Frank

#18
smallblockfuelie

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Great discussion, gents!





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